#AAIHS Conference 2018

Here at the African American Intellectual History Society Conference hosted by Brandeis University.

We are set to give papers on our panel theme: W. E. B. Du Bois’s Black Thought at 150: History, Memory, Literature & Politics.”

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King, Du Bois, Race, and Economic Justice

 

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It was exciting being a participant at the Clark Atlanta University symposium. I was thankful that the university was able to award me funding. Joined by friends and colleagues, I was able to engage and learn from a number of top scholars in the field of history, sociology, religion, and African-American Studies. I was excited by how well my paper was received by the audience. And, I was able to get some feedback on my research as I further develop my arguments.

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As seen above, I am discussing my paper that reflects a more traditional W.E.B. Du Bois. I will not comment much on my work here, but it was exciting sharing space with other academics seeking to advance their understanding of the past, and how reflecting on the past can bring about some resolutions to the problems of the 21st century.

Sho Baraka

On the final day of the symposium, Phil (pictured here to the left and Sho to the right) and I arranged to have coffee with artist Sho Baraka, who authored his lyrical album Talented Tenthafter that of W.E.B. Du Bois. This brotha is gifted. I am a fan. Better yet, I am in hopes of bringing him to Brooks campus to speak and perform. We were also recruiting him to write for a peer-reviewed journal we are editing.

The Story of O.J.

I am going to work this into my African American Studies syllabus. I am just seeing and hearing Jay-Z’ s The Story of O.J. Still processing. I am hearing Black sellouts. Black and white capitalist. Black folk still enslaved by debt. Black folk without real material power and wealth. Black bourgeoisie. Black working class. Poor Black folk. I am hearing you still Black at the end of the day– Black rich sellouts. White supremacy. Black caricature –watermelon and fried chicken. Gentrification. Panthers keeping it real. Some Oceans here. Nina Simone. Colorism. O.J. aint Black — he is O.J. Black supporters of Trump — sellouts. Drugs. Materialism. Religion.

Black and White Working Class

I wrote this essay on the past and current struggles of the Black and white working class in the United States. I noted that:

Racism has long divided the working class, and today is no different. Many white working class people voted for Donald Trump. And much like 2008, race was a reason. While some will salute a strong economy, in truth, wages have flattened for the working class. Because of this, and because white workers have grown suspicious of the burgeoning black power call by Black Lives Matter, the search for solidarity continues to escape a racially divided country, as noted by the current political climate.

This essay was published by the Hampton Institute here.

The Role of the Black Church

The Communist Party USA published my reading/presentation of an essay I wrote on the Black Church for African American History Month. This is an early part of my research addressing the shift of Black folk from religion to atheism, and the Black class struggle. “What was once called the Negro church in the course of the struggle for equality has emerged as a major force advocating, equality, democracy and social change. How did the transition from the Negro church to the black church take place; what were the class and social forces that helped shape it; how did these issues relate to the broader society issues in the U.S. during the 19th and 20th century?