Republican Immorality

The Republican Party is filled with monsters. They profess a love for Jesus — yet they represent the greatest immorality in this country. Hey — who cares if working class people die — at least we did what we said. White workers: You voted for this. #TheWealthyWhiteMaleParty

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Trying to Stay Positive and Love Better

I am trying to stay positive; I really am. But damn what rich white men keep doing to the marginalized. Do not ask me why I am always mad. In one week I heard a speech in which one person noted he is blessed to have a family that will assure he graduates from college debt free. And another speech in which a person was noted as having to work two jobs to get by. All of this in the same space. We as humans really do not care about each other.

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Images really are worth a 1,000 words: sexism, racism, classism, homophobia, transphobia, elitism, etc. I am teaching students daily what not to be in life. I am sure these “men” attend church. Gotta keep up the image for your supporters.

Trump Trumps God in 2016

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An August 2007 article in The Economist titled Is America Turning Left? gave a historical draw on the role of the right, especially the Christian right, in shaping American politics. It started off by stating:

            The most conservative president [George W. Bush] in recent history, a man who sought to turn his  victories of 2000 and 2004 into a Republican hegemony, may well end up driving the Western world’s most impressive political machine off a cliff.

In 2004, the Republican Party aimed to distract voters from a slipping United States economy and two foreign wars by making faith a part of its platform. That year many states put issues such as gay marriage on the ballot, urging faith-based voters to cast a vote defining marriage between a man and a woman. Such 2004 right-wing fervor still exist in politics and churches, but the post-Barack Obama era appears to have weakened the base of Christian-Republicans. Traditional Republican candidates quickly dissipated in this past election season. And though Donald Trump promises to appoint conservative judges to the bench, many suspect this is a ploy to maintain Christian Republicans.

If one turned their television to a religious station or attended a church service, they might hear how America is moving down an immoral path to being the next Sodom and Gomorrah. Trump, however, has placed distanced from such language in electing to use nationalism over religion, as noted by his campaign slogan: “Make America Great Again”.

Trump’s jingoistic language differs from the Puritanical faith-based thinking of past, which has garnered historical attention for centuries, starting with Jonathan Edwards and George Whitefield, movers of the First Great Awakening, which also cemented the South as the Bible Belt. Starting in the late 1970s, those who supported Barry Goldwater in 1964, unified to shape mass politics. Goldwater was the standard-bearer of the New Right Republican Party. Goldwater engineered a disgruntled white Conservative population fearing the United States was becoming too liberal. This emerging Republican population consisted of conservative ideologues, fundamentalist Christians, and populist voters who deplored the liberal social, political, and economic trends of the 1960s and hoped to change it. Many of them were against the civil rights legislation, arguing that they were unconstitutional as they undermined states’ rights.

Just like the First and Second Great Awakening of the 18th and 19th century, evangelical leaders were content to combat what they called the forces of Satan, by asking all believers to join in an attempt to save the souls of the lost. This action took place during religious crusades and revivals. By the Fourth Great Awakening, there was no need to rally the troops at revival camp meetings. A quick hit of a TV button had the religious right advocating for political candidates and against what they saw as the sins of liberalism. It was Richard Viguerie, a right-wing publicist, who marshaled the power of the computerized direct-mail advertising as a New Right unifier. This, as well as the message of Jerry Falwell’s Moral Majority, served as an impetus to fighting leftism.

Yet in 2016 the religious right has given their soul to Trump – not God. As I recently noted, Evangelical Christians in America must decide if they really value religious freedom or just the religious freedom of Jesus. If they value the latter — there will be a generational rebellion against them, and thus their purpose of Jesus sharing will die, as far too many right-wing Christian evangelicals have not sided with the love and empathy of Christ, but identity politics.

Trump and White Privilege

I want to be clear that I am making a generalization here about white privilege. White men — who are the most powerful actors in this country, claiming they are the victim. Folks (women and people of color) like me are perceived to be a threat to their hegemony. And we are. A recent study found that white men hire white men from similar backgrounds. Hence — societal inequalities are grand. What a great example of how white men perpetuate white supremacy. Hey — just look at the private school world or major industries.

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Black Memory

This is a fantastic essay by a colleague writing for the African American Intellectual History Society. I have worked very hard seeking to avoid my use of terms such as Uncle Tom or Sellout, when discussing black republicans or wealthy black folks who have abandon us. But, it is a constant struggle. This essay points to a post-racial myth often promulgated by white and black liberals, and consumed under conservative ideology. As noted here, “What has driven these Black folk out of their minds? Two words: racist ideas. They have consumed the racist idea of post-racialism that claims dysfunctional Black people are to blame for persisting racial disparities since racial discrimination no longer exists. They have consumed the racist idea that angry Black people are more violently reckless with colorblind police officers and that’s why they are being disproportionately killed.”

Is the Party Racist?

This piece has gone around the blogsphere since last week. As I noted on another blog, Powell is being honest and on the mark. I feel and have felt this way about the Republican Party since high school. I disagree with Powell regarding his notion that the party has changed; I think it has been this way dating back to the 1980s when it sought to garner the attention of white religious conservative Americans; the party has expanded its agenda in that — as noted by Powell — it is now way farther to the right regarding economic and social policy (Tea Party). But with the Tea Party all but dead, as noted in the last election, Republicans might seek to move back to the right — that is from the far right; I do not think it is a reactionary party. With the Democrats taking a strong victory during the November elections, the Cold War Republican Party might seek to regain its identity with the likes of a Colin Powell.